Special Sessions

Special Session: Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning in Education

Overview:

Artificial intelligence (AI) is making a significant impact in several industries, including education. The potential of AI to address some of the enormous challenges in education, innovate teaching and learning practices, and advance quality and inclusive education has further popularized its use in education sector. As a result, the students’ learning process is revolutionized as it transforms teachers and institutions. Several researchers estimate that the value of AI-powered education in 2025 will reach $5.8 billion and will continue to increase in the following years. This statistic suggest that AI is increasingly changing the teaching and learning process. In addition, we believe machine learning (ML), an application of AI will transform education and fundamentally alter how we teach, learn, and conduct research. For example, the use of machine learning is helping educators spot struggling students early and take action to improve their success and retention. In addition, localization, transcription, text-to-speech, and personalization of online learning content are being enhanced through machine learning. AI powered by machine learning has the potential to perform a range of tasks, such as monitoring student activity and predicting student performance. With the enormous benefits (and challenges) attributed to AI and ML in education, it is imperative that we understand how these technologies affect the education stakeholders. The aim of this special session is to discuss how AI and ML are transforming the education sector and how the students, parents, schools, and teachers can benefit from this science.

Topics of Interest:

Authors are invited to submit complete papers for the AIML in education special session. The topics includes but not limited to the following:

  • Help teachers to automate their administrative tasks
  • Tools enable the creation of accurate and targeted educational content
  • Personalized education using AI-ML
  • Secure online exam using for example facial recognition
  • Downsides to Utilizing AI in Education
  • Education chatbot
  • AI-ML and STEAM
  • Future Education Using AI-ML
  • Prediction student’s performance using AI-ML
  • Intelligent tutoring systems
  • Inclusive education using AI
  • Using AI for breaking down language barriers in education

Chair:

  • Prof. Seifedine Kadry, Applied Data Science Department**,** Noroff University College, Norway

Program Committee:

  • Ismaila Temitayo Sanusi, School of Computing, University of Eastern Finland
  • Dr. Fadia Cudry, Henry Ford College, MI, USA
  • Dr. Sahar Yassine, Noroff University College, Norway
  • Dr. Isah Lawal, Noroff University College, Norway
  • Dr. Thomas K.F. Chiu, The Chinese University of Hong Kong
  • Dr. Ashraf Alam, IIT Kharagpur, India

Submit Here: https://edas.info/N30187
Complete Paper Submission: December 5, 2022
Decision Notification: January 30, 2023
Camera-Ready Submission: February 20, 2023

Special Session: Preparing the Future Engineer-Business Generalists Who Can Lead Technological, Economic and Social Change. Acronym PFEBG

Overview:

This continuous Technological, Economic and Social change that is taking place in societies and an already evolving industry landscape has influenced the engineering profession to increasingly become more interdisciplinary. Today's new generation of engineers entering the industry are required to have more cross-disciplinary knowledge compared to engineers of the past. This has influenced higher educational institutions that are faced with questions like: • What skills do engineers need to stay relevant in today's changing society? • Do the existing engineering, science and technology programs build a solid business foundation for graduates? • How will the adoption of business education continue to shape workforce learning and development? To foster enhanced learning, we must now think of ways to integrate learning practices involving Business related disciplines such as Management, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Marketing, Finance and Economics.

In this special session, we invite scholars to rethink interdisciplinary teaching as an approach that combines different aspects of more than one academic discipline empowering technology-major students to explore business related topics in the context of engineering education. We invite discussions on novel pedagogical approaches, methods, and applications useful in engineering education that will prepare students to become powerful and successful leaders of technological, economic and social change. Topics The session aims to attract research papers and case studies on novel methods and applications related to technology-business education and cross disciplinary learning pedagogies. We invite researchers, developers, and practitioners from various fields, including but not limited to engineering, technology, computer science, information systems, multimedia, communication, business, medicine, linguistics, sociology, psychology, architecture and fine arts working on the following areas: Engineering Management Leadership Learning Business Strategy Learning Pedagogical frameworks Curriculum development Interdisciplinary learning in technology education 21st century skills Engineering Entrepreneurship education Student-centered learning Computer Security Business Ethics in technology education Language communication skills Technical writing Technology and gender issues Managing Engineering Teams ΣSocial Change Social Economy Social Values Change

Topics of Interest:

The session aims to attract research papers and case studies on novel methods and applications related to technology-business education and cross disciplinary learning pedagogies. We invite researchers, developers, and practitioners from various fields, including but not limited to engineering, technology, computer science, information systems, multimedia, communication, business, medicine, linguistics, sociology, psychology, architecture and fine arts working on the following areas:

  • Engineering Management
  • Leadership Learning
  • Business Strategy Learning
  • Pedagogical frameworks
  • Curriculum development
  • Interdisciplinary learning in technology education
  • 21st century skills
  • Engineering Entrepreneurship education
  • Student-centered learning
  • Computer Security
  • Business Ethics in technology education
  • Language communication skills
  • Technical writing
  • Technology and gender issues
  • Managing Engineering Teams
  • ΣSocial Change
  • Social Economy
  • Social Values Change

Co-Chairs:

  • Professor Despo Ktoridou, University of Nicosia, Cyprus
  • Professor Ioanna Dionysiou, University of Nicosia, Cyprus
  • Dr. Epaminondas Epaminonda, University of Nicosia, Cyprus

Submit Here: https://edas.info/N30187
Complete Paper Submission: December 5, 2022
Decision Notification: January 30, 2023
Camera-Ready Submission: February 20, 2023

Special Session: GinEE - Games in Engineering Education

Overview:

Today, electronic games are more than just pastimes – they are platforms through which we experience virtual situations, try out strategies, and develop respectively simulate new ideas. Game-Based Learning is set to grow rapidly in the near future. Its wide range of engineering applications includes automotive, aerospace and systems engineering, medicine, banking, and management. In this context, games are successful educational approaches, mainly when they are built on one of today's well-established didactic frameworks aiming at strengthening self-regulated personalized learning.

This Special Sessions (GinEE) within the EDUCON 2023 Conference, May 2023, Salmiya, Kuwait, aims to cover all aspects of gamification including game-based learning, applications of didactic frameworks, games engineering, serious games, storytelling, user studies, development of non-technical skills / meta-cognitive skills, simulation, learning scenarios based on virtual worlds, project-based learning–capstone projects, game-based learning arrangements, tools and applications for developing games in engineering education, experience reports, teaching cases, methodologies, personalization approaches as well as any work in progress. Our main goal is to bring together stakeholders for exchanging ideas and experiences and encouraging networking between academia and industry.

Topics of Interest:

This special session aims at presenting the latest developments in the games in engineering education area, exchanging new ideas and discussing open research questions and future directions. Original contributions that provide novel applications, studies, and experiences related to this topic are very welcome. Potential topics include but are not limited to:

  • Game-based learning
  • Application of didactic frameworks
  • Gamification
  • Games engineering
  • Serious games
  • Digital transformation
  • Storytelling
  • Usability Studies
  • Development of non-technical skills / meta-cognitive skills
  • Simulation
  • Learning scenarios based on virtual worlds
  • Project-based learning – capstone projects
  • Game-based learning arrangements
  • Development Tools for games
  • Applications of games in engineering education
  • Experience reports
  • Teaching cases
  • Methodologies
  • Personalization approaches
  • Digital Credentials, Micro-Credentials, Digital Badges
  • Remote / distance / online learning.

Co-Chairs:

  • Matthias C. Utesch, Chair for Information Systems and Business Process Management, Technical University of Munich, Germany, utesch@in.tum.de
  • André Thomas, Department of Visualization, Texas A&M University, United States of America, manink@arch.tamu.edu

Program Committee:

  • François Bry, Institute for Informatics, University of Munich, Germany
  • Clemens Drieschner, Chair for Information Systems and Business Process Management, Technical University of Munich, Germany
  • Klaus-Tycho Foerster (co-chair), Department of Computer Science, Technical University of Dortmund, Germany
  • Matthias Gottlieb, Chair for Information Systems, Technical University of Munich, Germany
  • Isabel John, Computer Science, University of Applied Science Würzburg Schweinfurt (FHWS) Germany
  • Marek Milosz, Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Lublin University of Technology, Poland
  • Thrasyvoulos Tsiatsos, Department of Informatics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece

Submit Here: https://edas.info/N30187
Complete Paper Submission: December 5, 2022
Decision Notification: January 30, 2023
Camera-Ready Submission: February 20, 2023

Special Session: Recognition of Learning: Status, Experiences, and Challenges

Overview:

Recognition of learning plays an important role in the educational landscape. It serves as an interface among institutions in the large for certification on the one hand, but also as a means of motivation, gamification, and bookkeeping throughout the learning process on the other. Badges, credentials, diplomas, etc. are variations of the same idea. The forms and formats vary, however. In the past these forms of recognition were basically paper-based. Moving them to the digital domain opens up a number of interesting opportunities, but also of new challenges to solve. There exist a number of different underlying technologies that are often unrelated and don’t interoperate well. What is the relationship between analytics, assessments, gamification, and badges? How to design a credentialing system? What are the strategies and best practices there? How is credentialing related to systems of digital identity? Welcome to the digitalization of the recognition of learning!

Topics of Interest:

  • Recognition of learning
  • Microcredentials
  • Badges
  • Rewards for learning
  • Gamification
  • Learning Analytics
  • Assessments and badges
  • Competence frameworks
  • Digital identity
  • Interoperability of credentialing systems

Chair:

  • Carlos Delgado Kloos, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Spain, cdk@it.uc3m.es

Program Committee:

  • Ruth Cobos Pérez, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Spain
  • Baltasar Fernández-Manjón, Universidad Complutense de Madrid
  • Manuel Freire Morán, Universidad Complutense de Madrid
  • Sergio Martín Gutiérrez, UNED, Spain
  • Pedro J. Muñoz Merino, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Spain
  • Maximiliano Paredes, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Spain
  • Miguel Rodríguez Artacho, UNED, Spain
  • Pilar Rodríguez Marín, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Spain
  • Bernardo Tabuenca Archilla, Univ. Politécnica de Madrid, Spain
  • Edmundo Tovar Caro, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Spain
  • Ángel Velázquez Iturbide, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Spain

Submit Here: https://edas.info/N30187
Complete Paper Submission: December 5, 2022
Decision Notification: January 30, 2023
Camera-Ready Submission: February 20, 2023

Special Session: Learner Engagement Analytics Informed Pedagogy (LEAP)

Overview:

The use of data analytics has become common practice across a wide range of sectors, as it is based on the extraction and interpretation of meaningful insights to enhance decision-making effectiveness. Over the years, data analytics has gained momentum within the higher education sector, resulting in a newer field of education research known as Learner Engagement Analytics (LEA). The increased focus on LEA has been driven by technological disruptions (i.e. online learning) compounded by the fact that there is a strong emphasis on how higher education institutions can facilitate a learning environment that enables their learners to reach their academic potential. LEA combines data sources based on student learning and engagement, which includes data generated by (but not limited to) learning management systems, student attendance and library systems. This data is analysed to gain insights into the learning experiences of the learners and improve student retention rates by recognising learners who disengage in the early stages of their programme. Strong evidence suggests that learners who start disengaging from their studies can often re-engage if interventions are taken quickly.

Furthermore, insights from LEA can inform an educator's pedagogic approach, which can have a positive impact on course/curriculum design and classroom practice. Educators can also use this information to assess the impact of their teaching. The aim of this special session is to share, explore, and discuss effective LEA-informed pedagogic approaches for the Engineering and Computer Science classroom.

We invite anonymous submissions in the form of short (4 to 5 pages) and full papers (6 to 10 pages), ranging from motivated viewpoints and opinions about LEA-informed pedagogic practices to evidence-based education research and the scholarship of teaching and learning. To facilitate a rounded discussion about LEA, this special session also welcomes submissions about LEA concerns, such as monitoring vs motivating, risk in privacy and ethical issues. Submissions can be in the form of experience reports and work-in-progress (WIP) to full research papers. The accepted papers will be shared with the Engineering and Computer Science academic community via IEEE Xplore Digital Library.

Topics of Interest:

This special session aims at presenting the latest developments in the area of Learner Engagement Analytics, exchanging new ideas and discussing open research questions and future directions. Original contributions that provide novel applications, studies, and experiences related to this topic are very welcome. Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • LEA-informed learning theories
  • LEA for practitioners
  • LEA-informed curriculum redesign
  • Educational intervention driven by LEA
  • Assessment and effective feedback between learners and educators in an LEA-assisted learning environment
  • Student retention and engagement
  • Learning management systems
  • Longitudinal tracking of individual learners
  • Learning analytics to support non-traditional learners
  • Planning, implementing, and/or evaluating learning design
  • Detailed case examples showcasing how LEA drives learning design changes
  • Applying LEA to improve IDEA (inclusivity, diversity, equity, and access)
  • Evaluation and comparison of LEA technologies
  • Ethical issues related to LEA
  • Onboarding instructors and/or students to LEA technologies
  • Equity, transparency, and fairness of LEA technologies
  • Data-informed decision making

Submit Here: https://edas.info/N30187
Complete Paper Submission: December 5, 2022
Decision Notification: January 30, 2023
Camera-Ready Submission: February 20, 2023

Chairs

  • Dr. Usman Naeem, School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science, Queen Mary University of London, UK, u.naeem@qmul.ac.uk
  • Dr. Lisa Bosman, Purdue University, Purdue Polytechnic Institute, West Lafayette, IN, USA, lbosman@purdue.edu

Program Committee

  • Arne Styve, Department of ICT and Natural Sciences (IIR). Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Norway
  • Dr. Atm Alam, School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science, Queen Mary University of London, UK,
  • Dr. Banu Köse, School of Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Natural Sciences, Medipol University, Turkey
  • Dena Hussain, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Computational Science and Technology, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden
  • Dr. Eranjan Udayanga Padumadasa, School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science, Queen Mary University of London, UK
  • Professor Mahesha Kapurubandara, Faculty of Computing, SLIIT (Sri Lanka Institute of Information Technology), Sri Lanka
  • Dr. María Isabel Pozzo, National University of Rosario, National Technological University & National Scientific and Technological Research Council, Argentina
  • Dr. Muhammad Awais Azam, School of IT, Whitecliffe, New Zealand
  • Dr. Olga Viberg, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Media Technology & Interaction Design, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden
  • Paola Mussida, Politecnico di Milano, Italy
  • Professor Yue Chen, School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science, Queen Mary University of London, UK
  • Dr. Zilu Liang, Kyoto University of Advanced Science, Japan
Special Session: Pre-University STEM Outreach: Igniting Interest in STEM in Young Students

Overview:

Pre-University STEM education is vital to our world economy. We must have a strong global STEM pipeline to meet the growing need for a high-skilled workforce.

  • Due to technology-driven growth and the necessity to replace the senior STEM workforce as they return, Europe's STEM labor market is projected to expand by 12.1% by 2025.

SOURCE: https://www.teknologisk.dk/_/media/64894_Does%20the%20EU%20need%20more%20STEM%20graduates.pdf

  • In the United States, employment in STEM occupations has grown 79%—increasing from 9.7 million to 17.3 million since 1990.

SOURCE: Via a 2018 article from Pew Research Center

The world needs diverse viewpoints and experiences to design solutions that meet each community’s unique needs. These solutions come when underrepresented communities are encouraged in STEM education and careers. Beginning STEM education at an early age (preuniversity) is critical to growing a strong and diverse pipeline. There is a growing interest from engineers, volunteers, teachers, professional associations, and organizations to invest in pre-university STEM education. One way of doing this is by providing students exposure to high-quality STEM activities and professionals, in and outside the classroom, so we can grow their technological literacy and they can ultimately see themselves as someone who can improve the world through a STEM career.

In this special session, proposed by IEEE Educational Activities Pre-University Education Coordinating Committee (PECC), we invite you to share your experiences in pre-University STEM outreach and discuss the best ways to ignite interest in STEM in young students.

Topics of Interest:

This special session aims at presenting the latest developments in Pre-University STEM outreach, exchanging new ideas, and discussing open research questions and future directions. Original contributions that provide novel applications, studies, and experiences related to this topic are very welcome. Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • STEM outreach experiences and best practices
  • Diversity and Inclusion in STEM
  • STEM Pedagogy
  • STEM Career Pathways
  • Impact and Data Collection
  • Gamification in pre-University STEM Education
  • Engineering Design Principles in Action
  • Emerging Technologies in pre-University STEM Education
  • AI adaptive learning - The role of the teacher in the AI era

Chairs:

Program Committee:

  • Dora Fourou, Mozaik, Greece
  • Sharon DeVivo, Vaughn College, USA
  • Ramneek Kalra, Amazon, India
  • Connie Kelly, USA
  • Heba Shaban, Arab Academy for Science, Egypt
  • Supavadee Aramvith, Chulalongkorn University, Thailand

Submit Here: https://edas.info/N30187
Complete Paper Submission: December 5, 2022
Decision Notification: January 30, 2023
Camera-Ready Submission: February 20, 2023

Special Session: Internet of Things Education for Engineering Practitioners (IoTEd'23)

Overview:

The Internet of Things (IoT) paradigm is starting to dominate various application spaces and becoming an essential part of our day-to-day life. This paradigm revolves around smart devices equipped with sensors that collect important data which, when analyzed and processed, can generate useful decisions and critical actions. The domains that benefit from such a paradigm include personal health and lifestyle, intelligent transportation systems, banking, education, gaming, smart irrigation and agriculture, and entertainment to name a few. Given this diversity of domains, it becomes essential to train engineering practitioners on IoT systems and platforms. Educating practitioners on IoT is facilitated by the popularity of cost-effective, single-board computers and microcontrollers that support a variety of capabilities (programming languages, I/O interfacing technologies, storage options, connectivity standards … etc) along with the availability of educational resources and open-source development frameworks provided by major vendors and players in the field of IoT. In other words, IoT education is becoming a dynamic field and creating innovative approaches to integrate it into postsecondary engineering education is becoming a necessity. This special session aims at shedding the light on the methodologies to approach IoT education and training for engineers. It will bring engineering instructors, educators, and researchers to draw on their experiences in enriching engineering curricula and training courses with IoT educational material, resources, and tools.

Topics of Interest:

This special session aims at presenting the latest developments in the Internet of Things Education for Engineers, exchanging new ideas, and discussing open research questions and future directions. Original contributions that provide novel applications, studies, and experiences related to this topic are very welcome. Authors are invited to submit complete papers. Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • IoT courseware
  • IoT education methodologies
  • IoT educational resources and frameworks for engineers
  • IoT education and project-based learning
  • IoT course format: online vs. on-site
  • IoT education to undergraduate students in engineering
  • IoT education and undergraduate research
  • IoT education in the era of COVID-19
  • IoT education curriculum
  • Application-oriented IoT education
  • Area-oriented IoT education

Chairs:

Program Committee:

  • Abdulaziz Al Helali, University of Toronto, Canada
  • Atheer Almogbil, Johns Hopkins University, USA
  • Imed Ben Dhaou, Dar Al-Hekma University, KSA
  • Taghreed Alghamdi, Ontario Technical University, Canada
  • Tushar M. Jois, Johns Hopkins University, USA

Submit Here: https://edas.info/N30187
Complete Paper Submission: December 5, 2022
Decision Notification: January 30, 2023
Camera-Ready Submission: February 20, 2023

Special Session: IDEE (Inclusion and Diversity in Engineering Education)

Overview:

Engineering should attract, promote, foster and retain talents, considering that individuals are different, and they can have characteristics that can require flexibility in the education system in order to guarantee equal opportunities of anyone regardless their gender, race or condition. These characteristics can make the developing of their skills more challenging for the students and for the educational institutions and their professionals.

Some of these characteristics can have a physical reason, such as deafness or blindness, other can be neurological, like autism or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and other students can be part of groups that are still underrepresented in academia, like women, or they belong to some minorities or ethnical groups.

The IDEE’23 at EDUCON 2023 aims to start a discussion and a reflection about the diversity and inclusion in Engineering Education (EE), identifying the problems and proposing solutions. It also wants to create a bridge from schools to universities, highlighting that many problems that are visible in universities are the results of base problems that appear in early stages of education. This special track wants to promote new ways to face and deal with the problem of the lack of representativeness in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM).

Topics of Interest:

  • Supporting young female students to enter the Engineering courses
  • Supporting graduate and undergraduate female students to complete the course
  • Supporting the development of the careers of women
  • Students with special needs
  • Technologies as a tool to integrate students
  • Fostering underrepresented Groups in the Universities
  • Peripherical regions, Diversity and Development
  • Diversity and entrepreneurship
  • Extension projects from university to foster inclusiveness
  • Public policies for inclusion
  • Diversity and job market
  • Inclusion and diversity for K-12 education
  • Support for professional transition to Engineering
  • Support for lifelong learning and training

Chair:

Program Committee:

  • Ana Luiza Lima de Souza, CEFET/RJ, Brazil
  • Balamuralithara Balakrishnan, University Pendidikan Sultan Idris, Malaysia
  • Carina Gonzalez, Universidad de La Laguna, Spain
  • Herlander Costa Alegre da Gama Afonso, CEFET/RJ, Brazil
  • Julia Merino, Tecnalia, Spain
  • Manuel Castro, Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia, Spain
  • Manuel Blazquez, HEI Ramiro de Maeztu, Spain
  • Musbah Koleilat Câmara, CEFET/RJ, Brazil
  • Pedro Plaza, Plaza Robotica, Spain
  • Rebecca Strachan, Northumbria University, United Kingdom
  • Elio Sancristobal, UNED, Spain
  • Antonio Menacho, Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia, Spain
  • Felix Garcia-Loro, Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia, Spain
  • German Carro, Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia, Spain
  • Javier Muñoz, Plaza Robotica, Spain
  • Monica Muñoz, Plaza Robotica, Spain
  • Alejandro Muñoz, Plaza Robotica, Spain
  • Pedro José Muñoz Merino, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Spain
  • Jose Manuel Saez Lopez, Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia, Spain
  • Sara Muñoz Sánchez, Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia, Spain
  • Mateo González Cid, Universidad de Vigo, Spain
  • Juan Alberto Abia Álvarez, Universidad de Vigo, Spain
  • Fernando Flores García, Universidad de Vigo, Spain
  • Alicia García Holgado, Universidad de Salamanca, Spain
  • Elena Rodríguez Lois, Universidad de Vigo, Spain
  • Cassia Isac, IFRJ, Brazil

Submit Here: https://edas.info/N30187
Complete Paper Submission: December 5, 2022
Decision Notification: January 30, 2023
Camera-Ready Submission: February 20, 2023

Special Session: Data Science Teaching Innovation in STEM Education: A Closer Look Into Pre- and Post-Covid Innovations

Overview:

In a data driven world, the importance of data literacy is becoming more apparent. More people form non statistical background are keener on learning statical methods, with thanks to recent crisis which emphasised the use of data as a tool for communication and decision making.

This means educator in Statistical and data driven science have more responsibility in designing and developing ways in which they can communicate the concept to non-statisticians.

Furthermore, the pandemic accelerated the development of new teaching methods and as the pandemic fades away, many educators are now trying to decide which practices to keep and what aspects of teaching and learning will go 'back to normal'.

In fact, as much as these emerging tools provide opportunities for students to engage better with data science and the data world, there are still many concerns around these advancements, not all learners and instructors have the required knowledge or access to effectively use these tools. Besides, the side effect of virtual learning on student’s wellbeing should be acknowledged and incorporated in future education strategies.

Talks and papers within this special topic will focus on dealing with current research that aims at exchanging and advancing educational knowledge of teaching and learning data science for both STEM related subjects.

The emphasis will be on the advancements in teaching methods during the pandemic and post pandemic and their effectiveness at present.

We will also look into best ways in disseminating statistical knowledge to non-statisticians in higher level of education, for example, PhD, MSc and also training supervisors for non-specialist related subjects.

Keywords—data science, covid, STEM, innovation, teaching

Topics of Interest:

This special session aims at presenting the latest developments in the pre- and post-covid education exchanging new ideas and discussing open research questions and future directions. Original contributions that provide novel applications, studies, and experiences related to this topic are very welcome. Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Teaching data science to non-statisticians, the topics can include but not limited to:
    • Statistical education in bio-medical engineering using data driven applications
    • Innovation in teaching financial engineering
    • Recent developments in use of software in education. For example, R, Python, SQL,..
    • Teaching teachers how to effectively use emerging technologies in STEM education
    • What emerging COVID teaching techniques can we keep post-covid?
  • Statistical literacy in post graduate STEM education
    • Techniques on advising non-specialist PhD students on the use of statistical inference on their research
    • Design and delivery of data science modules for non-statisticians in MSc and BSc level.
    • Facilitating collaborative working environment among statisticians and non-statisticians in the data related subjects
    • A closer look into the increased awareness/interest of statistics after pandemic in all levels
  • A Holistic approach to education with specific focus on STEM related subjects
    • Promoting collaborative work among STEM students by use widely available platforms post covid
    • Enhancement of group works to encourage interactions among different cultural groups to promote inclusivity, mental wellbeing and diversity (comparing pre and post covid data)

Chairs:

Program Committee:

  • Dr Fatma Benkhelifa, Coventry University, CSM
  • Dr Georgios Aivaliotis, University of Leeds, School of Mathematics
  • Dr Matina Rassias, UCL, Department of Statistical Science
  • Dr Mine Dogucu, UCL, Department of Statistical Science

Submit Here: https://edas.info/N30187
Complete Paper Submission: December 5, 2022
Decision Notification: January 30, 2023
Camera-Ready Submission: February 20, 2023